THAT’S NOT YOUR REAL GRANDMA JERRY

The House That Del Built: Dark Corners

thehousethatdelbuilt:

When I was eighteen, I saw John Malkovich in The Libertine at the Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago. Years later, the specifics of the plot had become a blur. I knew that it was about a debaucherous man living in a particularly decorous time in English history (was he Victorian?) and that his…

Because only half of comedy is noticing the darkness and absurdity of the human condition. The other half, the harder half, involves loving people so much, having so much hope for their goodness and their intelligence and their ability to learn and grow and change, that you believe that holding the mirror up to their darkness will reveal to them a new light.

As he said the line “There I go,” he flapped his arms through sleeves of a billowing white nightgown like an ironic angel who didn’t even believe in himself, and his gaze panned upward toward heaven. But now I realize, that is what a comedian is. Not a sad clown, but a reluctant angel, with powers he didn’t ask for and tasked with a mission for which he feels woefully unfit. The secret to not completely destroying oneself under the burden is not to believe in oneself, but to believe in others. A comedian’s martyrdom is less valuable to us than his minute but persistent hope that everything is not total shit. And if he can convince us that he has seen the dark corners of humanity and still persists in that hope, that is his gift to the world.

fan questions

setting up voicemail

samwisethebrave1:

This one’s pretty damn good!

i’m art now

samwisethebrave1:

This one’s pretty damn good!

i’m art now

daynewmah:

whenever nobody laughs at one of my jokes

daynewmah:

whenever nobody laughs at one of my jokes

New trailer for my first feature film! I’m the guy who gets skull-fucked.

Community Review: "Regional Holiday Music"

…so far, Community has a great track record in the holiday episode department, and I’ve come to associate the Christmas episodes in particular with the show’s deepest, innermost sense of earnestness and sincerity—because it’s in those episodes that its voice has sung out the clearest.

Last night’s episode—the show’s third annual Christmas installment, entitled “Regional Holiday Music”—sang out more clearly (and more literally) than ever, delivering a hilarious musical send-up of Glee (with a healthy dose of Invasion of the Body-Snatchers) while yet again managing to affirm its core values of friendship and togetherness. Like Britta, the show takes this opportunity to “sing its heart’s song”—albeit much less awkwardly.

 Excerpt from a piece I wrote over at PopBlerd.com. Community fans, check it out here!


Yes I do, I know exactly what will happen at 3:15. At 3:15 we aren’t going to get back in bed together, and she isn’t gonna wrap her legs around my legs, and we aren’t gonna fall asleep. And then, in the morning, she isn’t gonna say, “Hi person.” And then we aren’t gonna have another day, just an ordinary, boring day. And then we aren’t gonna have kids, and then we aren’t gonna grow old together, and we aren’t gonna look back on our lives, because we aren’t even gonna know each other. That is what is gonna happen at 3:15.

Yes I do, I know exactly what will happen at 3:15. At 3:15 we aren’t going to get back in bed together, and she isn’t gonna wrap her legs around my legs, and we aren’t gonna fall asleep. And then, in the morning, she isn’t gonna say, “Hi person.” And then we aren’t gonna have another day, just an ordinary, boring day. And then we aren’t gonna have kids, and then we aren’t gonna grow old together, and we aren’t gonna look back on our lives, because we aren’t even gonna know each other. That is what is gonna happen at 3:15.